When it comes to Phoenix web design, there are two kinds of businesses. One, who design their websites with creativity and great user interface in mind, and then there are those who pour all their design skills, passion, and heart into the website. Because a beautiful website is a successful one. Right?

They couldn’t be more wrong.

Sometimes the passionate effort, while creating web designs that can make Picasso weep, can result in websites that don’t convert. If you have a business that relies on a website to connect with new users, you should be aware of such website design pitfalls.

Rather than designing a website with creative techniques and elements that create eye-catching effects, focus on the usability. You are not running an entertainment show but a business; your goal is not getting standing ovations for website design, but conversions.

Creating Art versus Conversions

The approach behind designing a website differs for all businesses. But all of them could be roughly divided into three schools of thoughts.

Some businesses want to maximize their conversions at all costs. Their website design is focused on their business needs and its one and only goal is to drive sales.

The other one is centered on providing the visitor a visual experience that’s unique and extraordinary. These businesses see web designing as an artistic endeavor and want to enhance their user experience.

Then we have the third kind where some businesses combine the above two approaches and create a website that is visually remarkable while also being geared towards maximum conversions.

Oh there is also a fourth kind, we guess. These businesses try their best to use the third approach but their inner artists win over the conversion driving aspect of the website. Their design choices end up being good-looking, but not effective enough at converting the visitors. And this is what we are going to talk about today.

The Sure Shot Ways to Kill Conversions

Masonry Layout – Ever since the success of Pinterest, a lot of businesses started using the Masonry design for their websites. Even WordPress themes centered on this design are available now.

This layout offers a really clean and clutter free design that’s great for websites focused on providing a browsing kind of experience. But if the visitor is looking for specific content, this design is an absolute nightmare. Especially if you have an ecommerce website, you need a design that can facilitate easy search for specific information – which Masonry layout is not known for.

Unclear Calls-to-action – You’d think that all the business websites would focus on creating strong CTAs that convert. Apparently, that’s not the case. In some instances, the website designers lose the focus and pay more attention to the visual appeal of their design.

CTA must always be straightforward; clear about the action you want the visitors to take.

Overly Minimalist Layout – It is one thing to keep your website design clutter-free, but to look like you threw together a website in under an hour is not wise.

There are some design elements that you must never compromise on no matter how much of a minimalist-theme lover you are. Easy-to-spot navigation buttons, highlighted CTAs, and color contrast still needs your time and efforts. A lot of websites that take this minimum approach often end up too bland-looking. You don’t want your visitors to think that’s your working style!

Forgetting the Secondary Navigation Scheme (SNS) – There was a time when SNS used to be a crucial component of website layouts. Also known as “Breadcrumb Navigation”, it is very helpful for websites that are organized in a form of hierarchy.

As the name suggests, it is the secondary form of website navigation for user’s convenience. Many web designers focused on creating a ‘visually beautiful’ site, have stopped using SNS which is unfortunate. Visitors’ website navigation experience could be improved tenfold if you use SNS.

Ghost Buttons – Have you ever come across an old antique clock that reveals a hidden staircase? Oh the joy. That’s exactly what ghost buttons are. Beautifully hidden graphics, not all the site visitors can see them. Unless you wish to offer ‘hidden offers’ to site visitors, this is just fluff-stuff. Which you should avoid.

Final Word

Every website has a different goal that caters to a diverse customer base. One design won’t fit all, but you should try to find that crucial balance between site functionality, and getting vital conversions while creating something that attracts the customer’s attention. Just be aware of these conversion killing design elements and focus on getting more customers.